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Help with Unicorn Rainbow Cake (1 Viewer)

clerahi

Active Member
So the birthday cake specification is in...

Our granddaughter's answer was chocolate, rainbow, rainbow on top, unicorn on top, maltesers on top. I think the first rainbow means inside, I've seen those and thought that's a step too far. Our son added that she doesn't like fondant, which rules out my idea of wrapping it in white fondant. Does that mean a buttercream or ganache topping?

Any ideas based on this?
 

Angie

Administrator
Staff member
You're most welcome.

Aww, bless you when you get out and about, and the only thing you're thinking about is cake. 🤣 (We've all been there). 👩‍🍳

I must admit I wasn't sure what to expect after reading the reviews, but I stuck with my tried and tested batter, and it worked out fine, thankfully. I still had a little bit leftover, but I wanted to make sure that I'd at least get a cake shape out of them on my second batch, and I wanted to weigh them all out, making sure they were all even.

I agree with a few more layers; it will be roughly about 9 cm, depending on the amount of filling you put in. As for the dome, yes, there is a slight one which there normally is with a Victoria Sandwich; however, to combat this, just turn the top layer over so the bottom of it becomes the top. If that makes sense? (This is what we normally do when making a cake because the bottom of the cake is flat). You could also slice off a little piece of the dome also if it's a bit wobbly and then turn it over. All you have to do then is sort the filling. I think at the minute, though, just getting a proper cake shape out of the tins would be your best bet and then we can look at trimming or fixing them afterwards.

I look forward to seeing how you get on; just remember don't put your tins near each other (no touching) because otherwise, the mix gravitates toward the other pan, and they'll be a bit wonky, so make sure there is space between the tins.

Good luck! 😊
 

Angie

Administrator
Staff member
Here are pictures showing the insides of the cake layers after using three of the Wilton Round Cake Pan Set tins.

Wilton 5 Pan Tin Experiment by Help Me Bake (6) (Medium).jpg

Wilton 5 Pan Tin Experiment by Help Me Bake (7) (Medium).jpg
 
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clerahi

Active Member
They came out ok, they are flat and the sides are ok. They did cook slightly unevenly over two levels in the oven, so I think I'd swap them over half way through next time.

20210415_213341.jpg


The verdict is we could get the tins to work 👍. We aren't sure though whether a 6-inch cake is big enough for the granddaughter's birthday 🤔 and whether it needs to be 7-inch or 8-inch really. For a small birthday cake it's a perfect size tin.
 
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Angie

Administrator
Staff member
Well here they are just out of the oven...

View attachment 5986

Yeah, well, first things first we have cake! 😊Then secondly, we have cakes that came out of the tins! 😍 Whoop whoop! However, looking at those 3 above, they have shrunk back quite a lot from the edges of the tin, meaning they have baked quicker or spent slightly longer in the oven than needs be. Therefore I would say turn your oven down maybe a touch or bring them out a minute or so sooner. You can test the cake by pushing your index finger into it; if it springs back, it's done.

They came out ok, they are flat and the sides are ok. They did cook slightly unevenly over two levels in the oven, so I think I'd swap them over half way through next time.

View attachment 5987

The verdict is we could get the tins to work 👍. We aren't sure though whether a 6-inch cake is big enough for the granddaughter's birthday 🤔 and whether it needs to be 7-inch or 8-inch really. For a small birthday cake it's a perfect size tin.

If they have baked unevenly, then you may have hot spots in your oven. Because there are 5 tins, I wouldn't pull them out and change shelves simply because you allow cold air to penetrate the oven when you are halfway through baking; this can cause the cake to collapse. What I would suggest is to rotate the tins on the shelves. What shelves did you bake on? Did you bake on the middle and the bottom? I baked on the middle and then the shelf directly below it. So much so I had to flatten the batter down before the tin went in, so it had enough space to rise.

As for the size, I did say that Wilton had 6-inch and 8-inch tins when we first mentioned them. Now usually, for a small get together, a 6-inch cake is fine. But now you've seen the size of them obviously you are looking at more cake, 😁 however, keep in mind that although the cake slice may be small, you will be getting 5 layers of it.

So the choice is yours cake or more cake that is the question? 🤣

I've finished and posted the Rainbow Cake Topper Tutorial today and now I just need to finish the Unicorn one. 👩‍🍳


 
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clerahi

Active Member
However, looking at those 3 above, they have shrunk back quite a lot from the edges of the tin, meaning they have baked quicker or spent slightly longer in the oven than needs be. Therefore I would say turn your oven down maybe a touch or bring them out a minute or so sooner. You can test the cake by pushing your index finger into it; if it springs back, it's done.

If they have baked unevenly, then you may have hot spots in your oven. Because there are 5 tins, I wouldn't pull them out and change shelves simply because you allow cold air to penetrate the oven when you are halfway through baking; this can cause the cake to collapse. What I would suggest is to rotate the tins on the shelves. What shelves did you bake on? Did you bake on the middle and the bottom? I baked on the middle and then the shelf directly below it. So much so I had to flatten the batter down before the tin went in, so it had enough space to rise.
With the baking... I baked three cakes, two on top and one on the bottom, that's what the manual with the oven said to do on fan. Clearly that's not right 🤔🙄. Although they look over baked, actually inside they were just done, if not a tad under with one. I baked them for 17 mins at 170 fan. You're right, the oven must have hot spots, and some cold ones too. Everything I've baked on the middle shelf has come out perfect. I think two at a time on the middle shelf is the answer with this oven. My revised application for a second oven was approved by the Chief Planning and Finance Officer 😃 subject to two other projects I'd already agreed to do being completed first 🙄.

As for the size, I did say that Wilton had 6-inch and 8-inch tins when we first mentioned them. Now usually, for a small get together, a 6-inch cake is fine. But now you've seen the size of them obviously you are looking at more cake, 😁 however, keep in mind that although the cake slice may be small, you will be getting 5 layers of it.
We had quite a discussion on this. Yes, a 6-inch cake is indeed perfect for a smaller get together, however our granddaughter's birthday is after outdoor COVID restrictions are lifted so there is talk of a slightly larger party. More people means more cake, now I've seen the actual size a 6-inch one will be just too small. The conclusion is a 7-inch cake is the right size, it''s probably a better size for our own cakes as well. The 6-inch Wilton ones will come in handy for other things.

Cake or more cake..? The answer will always be more cake :shortcake::shortcake::shortcake::shortcake: 🤣

Thanks for posting the tutorial. I'll have a look at that later.
 

clerahi

Active Member
Two 7-inch tins coming tomorrow. That's it, testing and deliberations over, next week's task is to make a finished test five layer rainbow cake 👨‍🍳. Going to make six cakes (one spare) in three batches, fresh batter for each batch, baked on the middle shelf. Buttercream recipe sorted. Got gel colours 🌈.
 

Angie

Administrator
Staff member
I really appreciate the help that Angie's given. Next step is to try a finished cake with all the layers, filling and colours.
Biting Nails Reaction GIF by SpongeBob SquarePants

After seeing this post in the 'today thread,' it got me thinking about the building of the cake. I wrote this the other day but didn't want to bombard you with ways of doing things, so I put the post to one side. However, after your subsequent request for help with tools with the buttercream. (and not being sure if you know about a crumb coat) I thought it only fair to give you another option of how to cover the cake, and then you can work out what works best for you.

Now I'm not sure how fluffy your buttercream is (it will need to be soft enough to glide over the cake without tearing, you could try this out on your spare layer first before applying to the actual cake so you can see how well it spreads) or if it may be easier to apply the buttercream directly to all the cake in one go, nor do I wish to overload you with multiple ways of doing something. However, because you have multiple layers and they're not perfectly straight, this may help you keep them in one place while applying the buttercream without you getting covered in it. All you have to do then is cover the top when you've sorted the sides. Let it set, and then apply more coats later until you're happy with the finish.

So I think this may help you.

1. Check each layer, make sure they are as straight as you want them, take off any little domed bits with a knife, or flip them over, so the bottom flat side faces upwards. Lightly brush off any excess crumbs.

2. Stick the first layer to the base cake board with a little of the buttercream/frosting you will be using.
  • You can then also add strips of baking parchment to the base of the board underneath the cake to stop it from getting dirty when you are applying the buttercream
  • Or you can wipe the board down when you have finished with it.
  • Or you can apply the buttercream on one board and then transfer it to another board later, so see many options.

3. Fill the internal layers moderately and stack them on top of each other. The reason I say moderately is that you have five layers that you don't want sliding.

4. Once they are stacked, get a cake board that is the same size as your cake. I'm using a cake dummy in the pic because I don't have a real cake at the minute to show you. (That's because we ate it.) 🤣

Help with Rainbow Cake by Help Me Bake (2).jpg

5. Once you have cleaned the board (Tip 70 from my book). Place the silver side of the board on the top side of your cake.

Help with Rainbow Cake by Help Me Bake (3).jpg

6. Now, when you start to apply the crumb coat layer with buttercream/frosting, you have something to hold onto on the top to stabilise the cake, and you can lightly buttercream all the way up to the top without getting covered in buttercream/frosting. Once all the outer edges are done. Lightly cover the top, then place it in the fridge to let it set.

Help with Rainbow Cake by Help Me Bake (1).jpg

I've mentioned this technique so that you have something to stabilise the cakes while applying your outer layer.

However, you do what works best for you.
 

clerahi

Active Member
Thank you for posting this Angie :) , some very helpful tips. I have to admit decorating the cake is the one thing I'm thinking about the most.

not being sure if you know about a crumb coat
Never heard of a crumb coat until today...

In the tools thread, I mentioned the video I watched on YouTube. For the crumb coat and the final coat, she recommended using a "Swiss meringue buttercream". How does that differ to the buttercream I've made so far? Any views on it?

I don't have a real cake at the minute to show you. (That's because we ate it.) 🤣
🤣🤣 My Chief Planning and Finance Officer is now moonlighting as Head of Testing so any trial cakes are being "sampled" and often taken away for "further inspection".
 

Angie

Administrator
Staff member
Thank you for posting this Angie :) , some very helpful tips. I have to admit decorating the cake is the one thing I'm thinking about the most.

Don't think just do, but have a plan at least. 👩‍🍳

Never heard of a crumb coat until today...

I wasn't sure whether you had, so I thought I'd mention it.

In the tools thread, I mentioned the video I watched on YouTube. For the crumb coat and the final coat, she recommended using a "Swiss meringue buttercream". How does that differ to the buttercream I've made so far? Any views on it?

Swiss meringue buttercream is where you heat the egg whites and sugar over a bowl of water while mixing them. Then mix further to get the correct peaks. Then ensure it's the correct temp; once you've done that, you then add butter in stages. Americans use this all the time but over here, we tend to use buttercream and icing sugar a lot, the only reason being there isn't that much that can go wrong with ours.

With the swiss meringue, you have to ensure that the bowls grease-free otherwise, you'll not get the peaks you want, if you drop egg yolk in it, you won't get a rise out of the egg whites, and you need to ensure the temps are right, so the butter incorporates into it. So not much, really. 😂

To be honest with all the faff associated with it, I stay clear, but if you want to have a play about with it, then, by all means, have a go. I did a raspberry one a couple of years ago with my friend, and that kind of went to pot, so I didn't really bother after that. I will have another go at some point, but the faffing puts me off and whether it'll turn out or not because there's no guarantee. Well, unless you're a complete whizz at it, I think.

🤣🤣 My Chief Planning and Finance Officer is now moonlighting as Head of Testing so any trial cakes are being "sampled" and often taken away for "further inspection".

Lol! I like the fact that Chief Cheese is sampling 🎂 as is her right, quality control is an essential job, and she'll need lots of tea to go with it. Before you know it, you'll be hosting Afternoon teas weekly. 😂
 

clerahi

Active Member
To be honest with all the faff associated with it, I stay clear, but if you want to have a play about with it, then, by all means, have a go. I did a raspberry one a couple of years ago with my friend, and that kind of went to pot, so I didn't really bother after that. I will have another go at some point, but the faffing puts me off and whether it'll turn out or not because there's no guarantee. Well, unless you're a complete whizz at it, I think.
Hmm ok, I'll leave it for now. The YouTube video is UK, by someone who runs a cake shop in London.
 

Angie

Administrator
Staff member
They do it all the time then, so they'll be a pro at it then. Honestly, don't be put off by it. If you want to have a go, as I said, it's all down to personal preference.
 
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Angie

Administrator
Staff member
Just because I had problems doesn't mean to say you will. The issues I had were incorporating the butter, but you have a better stand mixer than I had, so it may be a doddle for you as long as you get your temps right.
 
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clerahi

Active Member
Just because I had problems doesn't mean to say you will. The issues I had were incorporating the butter, but you have a better stand mixer than I had, so it may be a doddle for you as long as you get your temps right.
She has a video on Swiss buttercream, looks straightforward with the right kit and some attention. Just need to work out how to add the chocolate.
 
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